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Heads Up Concussion

HeadsUpParents

 

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump or blow to the head. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

What are the signs and symptoms of a concussion?

You can’t see a concussion. Signs and symptoms of concussion can show up right after the injury or may not appear or be noticed until days or weeks after the injury. If your child reports any symptoms of concussion, or if you notice the symptoms yourself, seek medical attention right away.

DateOpponentLocationTimeLevels
11/19/19OrangeAway3:15 PMVarsity
11/19/19OrangeAway4:15 PMJunior Varsity
11/21/19Bolsa GrandeHome3:15 PMVarsity
12/3/19West CovinaHome3:15 PMVarsity
12/5/19Rancho AlamitosHome3:30 PMVarsity
12/6/19TournamentHomeAll Day
12/7/19TournamenthomeAll Day
12/10/19EdgewoodHome3:15 PMVarsity
12/12/19MagnoliaHome3:15 PMVarsity
12/13/19TournamentHomeAll Day
12/14/19TournamentHomeAll Day
12/17/19LoaraHome3:15 PMVarsity
12/19/19Santa AnaHome3:15 PMVarsity
1/7/20Ocean ViewHome3:30 PMVarsity
1/7/20Ocean ViewHome4:30 PMJunior Varsity
1/9/20Garden GroveAway3:30 PMVarsity
1/9/20Garden GroveAway4:30 PMJunior Varsity
1/14/20GodinezAway3:30 PMVarsity
1/14/20GodinezAway4:30 PMJunior Varsity
1/21/20SegerstromHome3:30 PMVarsity
1/21/20SegerstromHome4:30 PMJunior Varsity
1/28/20WesternHome3:30 PMVarsity
1/28/20WesternHome4:30 PMJunior Varsity
2/4/20GWL Finals - Day 1TBA
2/6/20GWL Finals - Day 2TBA

How can you help your child prevent a concussion or other serious brain injury?

• Ensure that they follow their coach’s rules for safety and the rules of the sport.
• Encourage them to practice good sportsmanship at all times. • Make sure they wear the right protective equipment for
their activity. Protective equipment should fit properly
and be well maintained.
• Wearing a helmet is a must to reduce the risk of a serious
brain injury or skull fracture.
– However, helmets are not designed to prevent
concussions. There is no “concussion-proof” helmet. So, even with a helmet, it is important for kids and teens to avoid hits to the head.

What should you do if you think your child has a concussion?

SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION RIGHT AWAY. A health care professional will be able to decide how serious the concussion is and when it is safe for your child to return to regular activities, including sports.

KEEP YOUR CHILD OUT OF PLAY. Concussions take time to heal. Don’t let your child return to play the day of the injury and until a health care professional says it’s OK. Children who return to play too soon—while the brain is still healing— risk a greater chance of having a repeat concussion. Repeat or later concussions can be very serious. They can cause permanent brain damage, affecting your child for a lifetime.

TELL YOUR CHILD’S COACH ABOUT ANY PREVIOUS CONCUSSION. Coaches should know if your child had a previous concussion. Your child’s coach may not know about a concussion your child received in another sport or activity unless you tell the coach.

If you think your teen has a concussion:
Don’t assess it yourself. Take him/her out of play. Seek the advice of a health care professional.

 

It’s better to miss one game than the whole season.

For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/Concussion.

CLICK HERE FOR A PRINTABLE VERSION OF THIS INFORMATION.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CONCUSSION IN HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS